Creative Writing on the Apocalypse

The End is Here – Creative Writing Collection

deadline for submissions: March 30, 2020

full name / name of organization: Spectral Visions Press (University of Sunderland)

contact email: [email protected]

Spectral Visions Press is now accepting submissions for The End is Here: A Book about the Apocalypse. We want to hear your unique take on the fall of civilisation, we want to see your visions of our potential future, and we want to journey into your dystopic worlds. If you have a story or poem that fits the brief, start submitting.

• Minimum 1,000 words, maximum of 5,000 words of prose or 30 lines of poetry.

• Submissions should be formatted as a word document; we cannot work with pdf.

• Submissions should be double-spaced, use a neutral font style, and font size of eleven.

• Please include your full name, email address, your piece’s title, the date of submission, and a short bio (100 words) all on a short cover letter.

• All work must be original and not have been used previously in another collection.

from UPenn’s CFPs

CFP: Pop Culture

Studies in Popular Culture: A Call for Submissions for Spring 2020 issue

updated: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 – 11:12amDr. Lynnette Porter, Editor/Studies in Popular Culture, Popular Culture Assoc in the Southdeadline for submissions: Thursday, August 1, 2019

Studies in Popular Culture (SiPC) is looking for submissions for the Spring 2020 issue. This journal of the Popular Culture Association in the South (PCAS) publishes articles on popular culture however mediated through film, literature, radio, television, music, graphics, print, practices, associations, events – any of the material or conceptual conditions of life. Contributors include distinguished anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, cultural geographers, ethnomusicologists, historians, and scholars in comics, communications, film, games, graphics, literature, philosophy, religion, and television.

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CFP: one-page story–wishes

Tidbits: A One-Page Story Anthology is looking for stories on the theme of wishes

updated: Wednesday, May 1, 2019 – 2:46pmTidbits: A One-Page Story Anthologydeadline for submissions: Sunday, June 30, 2019

Theme: Wishes

www.tidbitswriting.com

We are looking for one-page story submissions to the inaugural edition of Tidbits: A One-Page Story Anthology. For this collection, we would like authors to consider the theme of wishes. This encompasses but is not limited to:
dreams 
hopes
fantasies 
needs
desires
wish-granting entities (genies, fairies, etc)
be careful what you wish for stories 
consequences of wishing
wishful thinking

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CFP: Composition and Rhetoric

Composition and Rhetoric: Practice (CEA 4/5-4/7/18)

deadline for submissions:
November 1, 2017
College English Association

contact email:
[email protected]

Call for Papers, Composition and Rhetoric: Practice at CEA 2018

April 5-7, 2018 | St. Petersburg, Florida

Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront

333 1st St South, Saint Petersburg, Florida 33701 | Phone: (727) 894-5000

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on Composition and Rhetoric: Practice for our 49th annual conference. Submit your proposal at http://www.cea-web.org

The special topics chair for Rhetoric and Composition: Practice welcomes proposals on a range of topics exploring our writing classrooms, pedagogies, and practices. Proposals may address the following topics:

How can writing courses help students build bridges to other courses and disciplines?
How can course and/or program design help students reach their writerly and academic goals?
How can we use technology to bridge theory and practice in the classroom?
How can first-year composition act as a bridge between high school and college?
Other areas related to rhetoric and composition in the classroom

Conference Theme

CEA welcomes proposals for presentations on the general conference theme: Bridges. The Sunshine Skyway Bridge crosses Tampa Bay from St. Petersburg, called the Sunshine City in honor of its Guinness Record for most consecutive days of sunshine (768). St. Petersburg is home to historic neighborhoods, distinguished museums, contemporary galleries, and a wide variety of dining, entertainment and shopping venues. St. Petersburg is also home to the College English Association’s 2018 national conference, where we invite you to join us at our annual meeting to explore the many bridges that connect places, texts, communities, words, and ideas.

CEA invites proposals from academics in all areas of literature, language, film, composition, pedagogy, and creative, professional, and technical writing. We are especially interested in presentations that build bridges between and among texts, disciplines, people, cultures, media, languages, and generations.

For your proposal you might consider:

Bridges between disciplines, languages, or generations
Bridges between races, classes, cultures, regions, genders, or sexualities.
Cultural or ideological bridges in literary, scholarly, or theoretical works
The bridge as construct, form, metaphor, motif, or icon
Connections between text and images or sound
Bridges between theory and practice, reading and writing, writer and audience
Building bridges between teaching and scholarship; faculty and administrators; professors and students
Bridges as physical artifacts and symbols of industry and technology
Digital humanities as a bridge between worlds
What bridges connect, support, and pass over
General Call for Papers

CEA also welcomes proposals for presentations in any of the areas English departments typically encompass, including literature criticism and scholarship, creative writing, composition, technical communication, linguistics, and film. We also welcome papers on areas that influence our work as academics, including student demographics, student/instructor accountability and assessment, student advising, academic leadership in departments and programs, and the place of the English department in the university.

Submission: August 15-November 1, 2017

For more information on how to submit, please see the full CFP at http://www.cea-web.org

Membership
All presenters at the 2018 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2018. To join CEA, please go to http://www.cea-web.org
Other questions? Please email [email protected]

Sincerely,

Catherine Forsa
[email protected]

from UPenn’s CFPs

CFP: Mythology in Contemporary Culture

Mythology in Contemporary Culture

deadline for submissions:
October 1, 2018
Popular Culture Association
[email protected]

2018 Popular Culture Association (PCA) & American Culture Association (ACA) National Conference
March 28-31, 2018
J.W. Marriott, Indianapolis

MYTHOLOGY IN CONTEMPORARY CULTURE

Call for Papers

The Mythology in Contemporary Culture area is dedicated to exploring mythological stories, figures and themes from all cultures and historical periods in all areas of popular culture. The frequent appearance of mythological motifs in all areas of popular culture speaks to the notion that mythologies, far from being relics of the past, continue to have significance. Contemporary revisionings and reinterpretations of mythological elements reflect the attitudes of current culture. Movies, television, computer games, comics, graphic novels, traditional literature, visual arts, performing arts, politics, blogs—the list goes on–-hold both explicit and implicit renderings of archetypes such as Thor and Athena and Kali, and of mythological narratives such as those found in bodies of sacred literature, classical Greek tragedies, and medieval Grail legends, to name only a few examples.

Proposals that pertain to the general theme of Mythology in Contemporary Culture are welcome. We will consider proposals for individual papers and/or panels organized around a theme. Sessions are 90 minutes, typically with four presenters per session. Presentations should not exceed 15 minutes.

To submit your panel or presentation, go to http://ncp.pcaaca.org and follow the instructions for creating an account and making your submission. All submissions must be made through the conference submission site. General instructions for submitting proposals through the PCA website may be found here: http://pcaaca.org/national-conference-2/proposing-a-presentation-at-the-conference/. For individual papers, please submit a title and 100-250 word abstract. For themed paper sessions, each presenter should enter her/his own proposal and the chair should contact Dr. Rittenhouse to assemble the papers into a panel.

Deadline: October 1, 2017

Questions about the Mythology in Contemporary Culture area may be directed to:

Kate Rittenhouse, Ph. D.
(604) 836-5396
[email protected]

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CFP: Embodiment in SFF

Embodiment in Science Fiction and Fantasy Interdisciplinary Conference

deadline for submissions:
October 31, 2017

McMaster University, Department of English and Cultural Studies

[email protected]

Embodiment in Science Fiction and Fantasy Interdisciplinary Conference
May 18-19, 2018
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Keynote Speakers

Veronica Hollinger, emerita professor, Cultural Studies Department, Trent University, science fiction scholar and co-editor of the journal Science Fiction Studies and collections including Queer Universes: Sexuality in Science Fiction (2008). Parabolas of Science Fiction (2013), and The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction (2010).

Kameron Hurley, the Hugo and Locus Award-winning author of Stars Are Legion (2017), The Geek Feminist Revolution (2016), the Worldbreaker Saga, and The God’s War Trilogy.

In response to the popularity of cyberspace disembodiment of the 80s and 90s, SFF is increasingly concerned with exploring the materiality of bodies. SFF literature, film, television and video games frequently explore how experiences of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and disability inform the construction of identity and influence lived experience; question what it means to be or exceed the human; and consider the agency and nature of nonhuman bodies. This conference will explore the ways in which the body is a focus in SFF, and how the experience and representation of bodies inform how we understand human, post-human, and non-human subjects, and their positionality within material and cultural settings.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers—or panels consisting of three 20-minute papers—addressing topics that include but are not limited to the following:

gender identity
sexuality
race and ethnicity
representations of disability
body modification, cyborgs, clones
post-human and non-human embodiment
technology and the body
metamorphosis and hybridity
bodily experiences of environmental crisis
bodies, space, and geography
pregnancy, birth, aging, death and dying
bodily containment (in spaceships, or exo-skeletons)
environments as bodies, sentient ecological networks
bodily manifestations of the soul or spirit

Please send inquiries and proposals to [email protected] by October 31, 2017.

from UPenn’s CFPs

CFP: Routledge Comic Studies

Routledge Advances in Comics Studies Series.

The series promotes outstanding research on comics and graphic novels from communication theory, rhetorical theory and media studies perspectives. Additionally, the series aims to bring European, Asian, African, and Latin American comics scholarship to the English speaking world. The series includes monographs and themed anthologies.

For proposal guidelines contact:

Randy Duncan
Henderson State University
[email protected]
or
Matthew J. Smith
Radford University
[email protected]

Available Now

Reading Art Spiegelman By Philip Smith

The Modern Superhero in Film and Television By Jeffrey Brown

The Narratology of Comics Art By Kai Mikkonen

Coming Soon

Empirical Approaches to Comics Research: Digital, Multimodal, and Cognitive Methods Edited by Alexander Dunst, Jochen Laubrock and Janina Wildfeuer

Batman and the Multiplicity of Identity: The Contemporary Comic Book Superhero as Cultural Nexus By Jeffrey Brown

Immigrants and Comics: Graphic Spaces of Remembrance, Transaction, and Mimesis Edited by Nhora Lucía Serrano

For more information on any of these books or to place an order, please visit: https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Advances-in-Comics-Studies/book-series/RACS

from RhetoricCFP.blogspot.com

CFP: Currents in Teaching and Learning

Currents in Teaching and Learning
Currents in Teaching and Learning, a peer-reviewed electronic journal that fosters exchanges among reflective teacher-scholars across the disciplines, welcomes submissions for its Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 issues (Volume 10, Numbers 1-2), and looks ahead to the special themed issue for Spring 2019. We consider all submissions that address new approaches to theories and practices of teaching and learning.
Each year we release two issues of Currents, an open-ended Fall issue and a themed issue in the Spring. We welcome all teaching and learning-related submissions for the Fall Issues.

The following are the themes for the Spring 2018 and Spring 2019 issues:

The theme for the Spring 2018 issue is “theories and practices of project-based and problem-based learning.” Project-based learning has been described as “a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge.” Problem-based learning has been defined as a student-centered pedagogy in which students learn about a subject through the experience of solving an open-ended problem.” We invite submissions that address any or all aspects of these approaches to teaching and learning. Some questions that might be addressed include (but are not limited to):

· What kinds of knowledge and skills should educators be cultivating inside and outside the 21st century classroom?

· How do long-term projects and open-ended problems fit into curricula that are often content-driven?

· How do (or should) educators guide students who are frequently risk-averse toward taking on “authentic, engaging and complex questions, problems, or challenges”?

Looking ahead, the theme for the Spring 2019 issue is “Globalizing learning.” With the intensifying clash between nationalism and globalization, the issue of how to incorporate consciousness of global issues and trends into college education has become ever more critical. For this issue, we invite submissions that address this issue from theoretical and/or practical perspectives. Some questions that might be addressed include (but are not limited to):

· What constitutes “global learning”, and what implications might this have for the nature, substance, content, and methods of tertiary education?

· What kinds of approaches can be used to integrate global knowledge and skills into teaching and learning across the disciplines?

· In what ways can global and local forms of knowledge construction be related in classroom and extra-curricular modes of teaching and learning?

Submissions may take the form of:

· Teaching and Program Reports: short reports from different disciplines on classroom practices (2850–5700 words);
· Essays: longer research, theoretical, or conceptual articles and explorations of issues and challenges facing teachers today (5700 – 7125 words);
· Book and Website Reviews: send inquiries attn: Book Review Editors. No unsolicited reviews, please.

We welcome both individual and group submissions. All submissions must be original, previously unpublished work and, if based in a particular academic discipline, must explicitly consider their relevance and applicability to other disciplines and classroom settings.

Submissions Deadlines:
Fall 2017 issue: August 15, 2017
Spring 2018 issue: December 1, 2017

Submissions received after these dates will be considered for the following issue and on a rolling basis.

Currents in Teaching and Learning is a peer-reviewed electronic journal that fosters non-specialist, jargon-free exchanges among reflective teacher-scholars. Published twice a year and addressed to faculty and graduate students across the disciplines, Currents seeks to improve teaching and learning in higher education with short reports on classroom practices as well as longer research, theoretical, or conceptual articles, and explorations of issues and challenges facing teachers today.

Send all inquiries to Editor Martin Fromm or Editorial Assistant Kayla Beman at [email protected] For submission guidelines, visit our website at www.worcester.edu/currents.

Currents in Teaching and Learning is a publication of Worcester State University, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. ISSN: 1945-3043

from RhetoricCFP.blogspot.com

CFP: Engineered Humans

Organic Machines/Engineered Humans: (Re)Defining Humanity

deadline for submissions:
November 15, 2017
full name / name of organization:
Special Issue of Interdisciplinary Humanities
contact email:
[email protected]
Now that school is OUT, it’s time to do some writing for yourself – and if you are a fan of scifi, or intrigued by the singularity, or the human/machine interface that is currently underway, this is the topic made for you!

From E.T.A Hoffmann’s Tales of Hoffmann and Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep to Isaac Asimov’s I, Robot and Vernor Vinge’s Rainbows End, authors have been exploring the human/machine interface since before the computer age. Today we stand on the threshold to the lab as the government contemplates microchipping all U.S. military personnel and Swedish office workers are already implanting themselves for convenience ala M.T. Anderson’s Feed. A 2014 study conducted by Cisco System found approximately one-quarter of the white-collar professionals surveyed “would leap at the chance to get a surgical brain implant that allowed them to instantly link their thoughts to the Internet”. We are already experimenting with gene therapy, cybernetics via cochlear implants and many other technical organic enhancements, autonomous self-replicating robots, nanotechnology, mind uploading, and artifcial intelligence.

The Spring 2018 edition of Interdisciplinary Humanities wants to consider topics focused on transhumanism, the singularity, and the arrival of the bio-engineered human/machine interface and what it means for the humanities as we redefine identity, pedagogy, humanity, class structure, literature (past, present, and future) and the diversity of our species. We also want to consider papers on the future of recreation, literature, music, and art. We invite papers in disciplines and areas of study that include but are not limited to Aesthetics, Anthropology, Architecture, Art, Classics, Communication Studies, Composition, Cultural Studies, Dance, Design, Digital Technology, Disability Studies, Education, Environmental Issues, Esthetics, Ethics, Ethnic Studies, Family, Film Studies, Gender Studies, Geography, Geology, Globalization, History, Languages, Law, Literature, Media, Museum Studies, Music, Pedagogy, Performance Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sexuality, Sociology, Theater, Women’s Studies, and all sciences relevant to the topic. These disciplines will help us understand and grapple with how we will redefine identity and the diversity of our species through the dynamic interplay of humanity and the acceleration of technology.

The Humanities Education and Research Association, Interdisciplinary Humanities’ parent organization, requires that authors become members of HERA if their essays are accepted for publication. Information on membership may be found at: http://www.h-e-r-a.org/hera_join.htm.

from UPennCFPs

CFP: Review Articles on American Studies

Seeking Review Articles for Canadian Review of American Studies

deadline for submissions:
August 31, 2017
full name / name of organization:
Canadian Review of American Studies
contact email:
[email protected]
Canadian Review of American Studies, a journal published by the University of Toronto, is seeking review articles for upcoming issues. Typically, a review article surveys three recently published books that explore similar or intersecting themes, summarizing the main issues raised between texts and offering a critical perspective of the given field. If interested, please provide a brief paragraph (250 words max) outlining your review article including the three books intended for review. Editors will make selections based on these proposals following the submission deadline. If selected, the Reviews Editor will provide desk copies from the publisher for your review article.

CRAS is currently accepting review article submissions on a wide range of topics in the context of American literature, culture, and politics.

Please contact the Reviews Editor, Chris Vanderwees, with any questions or suggestions pertaining to review articles.

Canadian Review of American Studies is the leading American Studies journal outside the United States and the only journal in Canada that deals with cross-border themes and their implications for multicultural societies. Published three times a year, the journal aims to further multi- and interdisciplinary analyses of the culture of the US and of social relations between the US and Canada. CRASis a dynamic and innovative journal, providing unique perspectives and insights in an increasingly complex and intertwined world of extraordinarily difficult problems that continue to call for scholarly input.

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