Amelia Bedelia for L2

True Confession Time:

I have always loved the Amelia Bedelia stories. That is not what I need to confess, though. Everyone who loves words should love those books.

What I have to confess is I didn’t know that words that mean the opposite of each other are called contronyms.

dust contronym Amelia Bedelia

Dust is a contronym.

So are
buckle
cleave
overlook
peruse
ravel
rent
sanction
screen

For when I am teaching linguistics or my ESL bridge class.

Metaphors

Metaphors are not just for literature anymore.

The Guardian has an article on the Glasgow University research work on 13 centuries of metaphors. The map is cool, though the description is limited.

However, you can read the @MappingMetaphor blog and find details. The newest post on fear is interesting.

Indonesian Metaphorical Conceptualizations of Anger: Does Anger Taste Delicious or Disgusting? By Tessa Yuditha

Indonesian also has its own metaphorical expressions. Some of conventional Indonesian metaphors include Dia menjadi kambing hitam dalam kasus itu ‘He became the scapegoat in that case’, Jatuhnya harga saham membuat dia bangkrut ‘The fall in stock price made him bankrupt’ and Kata-katanya membuat aku meledak ‘His words made me blow up’.

The Guardian has an article on educational metaphors. I used this in a class recently and would like to discuss it again more thoroughly. Something that was particularly interesting to me:

“My teacher is an old cow.” What does this mean? How would you respond, as a teacher, if this were said about you?

The New York Times article This is Your Brain on Metaphors is also interesting. It says that your brain sometimes/often interprets metaphorical things literally.

In a remarkable study, Chen-Bo Zhong of the University of Toronto and Katie Liljenquist of Northwestern University demonstrated how the brain has trouble distinguishing between being a dirty scoundrel and being in need of a bath. Volunteers were asked to recall either a moral or immoral act in their past.

Amazon’s Names

“Worthy of Armor” was the name of an Amazon detailed in a Greek drinking cup. “Princess Don’t Fail” was another name rendered there.

Amazon Warriors’ Names Revealed says:

Essentially, the ancient Greeks seem to have been trying to re-create the sounds of Scythian names and words on the Amazon vases by writing them out phonetically, the study authors suggest. In doing so, the Greeks may have preserved the roots of ancient languages, showing scholars how these people sounded on the steppes long ago.

Amazons were thought to be solely mythological until archaeologists unearthed Scythian burials of real women warriors, says Mayor, a visiting scholar at Stanford University and author of the just-released The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World.

The names were probably nicknames or heroic appellations given to Amazons, rather than real family names. Even today, Colarusso says, speakers of modern-day languages in the Caucasus region often use public, descriptive nicknames rather than reveal their real names.

For linguistics.

Original Pronunciation

britain_william_shakespeare martinShakespeare’s Globe did a Shakespearean play with original pronunciation. This is a 10-minute video about it–with examples: http://twentytwowords.com/performing-shakespeares-plays-with-their-original-english-accent/

“It’s an interesting accent to tune your ear into.”

Very useful for linguistics and British literature.

“three kind of evidence that you look for…
observations made by people who are writing on the language at the time… Ben Jonson the dramatist tells us, ‘We actually pronounce the r…’
spellings people used at the time … at one point in Romeo and Juliet the word film is spelt p-h-i-l-o-m-e…That’s a very important indication.
rhymes and puns which don’t work in Modern English that do work in OP… ”

2/3s of Shakespeare’s sonnets have rhymes that don’t work in Modern English but do in OP.

“Actors all said that the OP altered their performance…It changed the way they perceived their characters…”

“The OP Romeo and Juliet was 10 minutes faster.”

“It’s an earthier accent.”

“can make the original meaning clearer”

“sound shift… from pronunciation of whore to o’er/ore… perfect pun”

“working our way back to Shakespeare”